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Sandwiching

 

 

Page 6 of 10 pages.

 

[Item Image]

Creation of Plate 22

(See Portfolio plate 22)

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Double Exposure - Projector Style!

The accidental double exposure happens to most photographers sooner or later, although perhaps it is not so common with the newer foolproof cameras of today.  It can be very annoying, when two perfectly good photographs have both been ruined, by being exposed one on top of the other.

For some photographers it is a deliberate attempt to create something interesting, but then so much guesswork is involved.  There is a reliable method using a mask on the camera lens, that stops first one half and then the other half of the frame from being exposed, so that two scenes can be combined in the middle.  Otherwise there is little real control of the end result with these double exposures.

The first option with the projector is to mount two pieces of film, sandwiched in the same mount, and project the combined images on to a screen.  By focusing on one of the images, the one in true focus will dominate and soften the other.  Much depends on the slide carrier used, but if there is room to insert more than two mounts in to the carrier, then the more space between the two films the greater the effect of one image dominating the other.  Should both images need to be in focus then the closer they are to each other the better.

When sandwiching films in this manner it is possible to insert one or the other upside down, on its side, or the other way round.  Plate 22 (above) was created in this sandwiched way.  The transparency of Debra with her hair flowing, or so it appears, was actually taken with her lying on her side and the hair hanging down.  By placing this image horizontally instead of vertically her hair now appears to be blowing in the wind.  The other picture sandwiched with her is a negative taken of some rockroses.

There is little more opportunity with this technique of controlling the end result, so it is only a little bit better than double exposure as at least one can see what the result looks like first.

 

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