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Two Projectors and Image Blending

 

 

Page 7 of ten pages.

 

[Item Image]

Creation of plate 24

About proportions (See Portfolio plate 24)

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Two Projectors

A far more sophisticated technique for combining images is preferred, because so many more exciting possibilities exist.  This method involves using two projectors, but one has then an exciting way of blending any two previously created pictures, with far more control!

The technique is simple, just project both images separately on to the same choice of screen.  However, these images can now be positioned which ever way one might wish, one image could be much larger than the other, or by masking parts of each image, a different blend of the two pictures can be created.  This is how any parts, of any picture, can be blended together and all the time one can see exactly what is to be photographed.

Ideally, two identical projectors should be used, if possible with zoom lenses.  Should this prove impractical then variations in performance of the second projector can be allowed for, by masking the brighter of the two, just in front of the lens to achieve the same brilliance from both projectors.

To enhance the quality of the results one can achieve with this technique, there is an advantage in obtaining a screen designed for rear projection.



Image Blending

Once the full potential of using two projectors is realised, there will be a need for quite different types of images, these are what are referred to as background shots, in the advertising world.  A completely new stock of photographs will have to be taken, with blending potential in mind, no matter how many pictures are available from the past.

The main disadvantage of the sandwich technique is that there is no allowance for selective shading, masking, or changing colours of part of one, or the other image.  One has to accept the full influence of the one image on the other as they exist.

Instead of sandwiching the two pieces of film, project them separately at the same screen to overlap each other.

Now each image can be simply modified: The brightness of one image, as against the other, can be controlled.   By masking and shading just parts, of each image, can be blended.  Colours of certain areas can be altered with filters.  The position of each image, relative to each other, can be adjusted.  Or even the size, of one image as against the other, can easily be altered.  One of the images could be distorted, reflected, or be changed in to a pattern by the use of a crystal.  The possibilities are quite staggering!

Best of all, the combined images are there to be seen all the time, until the desired result is formed.  There is no need to rely on guesswork, as so many other special effects seem to demand, with these methods no film really should ever be wasted.

To demonstrate the different options let us start with plate 24 Children's hour (above).  The portrait was projected, whilst a photograph of the clock (taken against a black background) in the second projector, was aimed to overlap the portrait.  The advantage of scale has been used here, as really the clock face was larger than the baby.  This was easily done with a zoom lens otherwise it could also have been achieved by altering the distance between the screen and the projector.

Sometimes there can be a problem of one image appearing far brighter than the other.  This can happen if one photograph is denser than the other is, or if one projector is that much closer to the screen.  This is a problem that can be tackled two ways.  The first method is to mask close to the front of the projector lens, projecting the brighter image, to darken it.  The other way is to double expose with the camera.  Simply block the light from one projector, expose the first image, then block the other projector and take the second exposure, corrected for the brightness.

Plate 23 (below) is only mentioned to demonstrate how solid objects, such as the Churchill memorial crowns, can be made to appear transparent.  Projecting two transparencies, each a portrait of Susan created the plastic surgery effect plate 25 (below).  These were carefully aligned so that the two nearest eyes exactly overlapped each other.  It was then just a case of carefully masking away the parts of each portrait projected that was no longer required.

With two projectors it becomes possible to mix film effects together in a way not possible before.  It is so easy to blend negative images with transparencies, in colour, or black and white.  Instead of transparencies in both projectors, one of them could be projecting a black and white negative, or a colour negative just as easily.

 

 

 

[Item Image]

Creation of plate 23 'Churchill'

(See Portfolio plate  23)

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(Note how a solid coin can look transparent.)

 


[Item Image]

Creation of plate 25

(See Portfolio plate 25)

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Page 7 of 10 pages.

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